A new commission for Northern Art Carbooty; A new commission for Ancoats

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As part of this years Northern Art Carbooty, The Wewiora Project Sisters were delighted to commission local artist Emily Speed to respond to the location of our site venue, 1 Primrose Street, which is based within the heart of the Ancoats conservation area.

The artist was particularly taken with the Victoria Square Housing building, where Northern Art Carbooty was in residence with fellow artists Claire Tindale & Liz Wewiora (as Common Ground Collective), Nicola Colclough and Li-En Yeung delivering workshops to create work for resident community stalls. 

What came from this point of interest from the artist was a site-specific architecturally inspired performance which appeared in and around the Northern Art Carbooty venue, working as an not only an intervention but also a celebration of Ancoats on the day!. 

About Emily’s Commission: 

‘The Homes of Real Men and Women’
 
Women and men, real men and women, on Sundays had regular ‘up and down’ pitch battles, women with breasts bare and petticoats turned up, cock fights and dog fights were held here as lately as 1866. Yet by the 1890s it was said (rather sadly, perhaps) “You hardly ever see a street fight”
 
Rushton, Peter, ‘Family Survival Strategies in Mid-Victorian Ancoats’, 
 
(Images c. Emily Speed, 2014) 
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Beth Collar hones in on the archives and theory of men in feminism & raising ownership of language

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Beth Collar is Wewiora projects’ current artist-in-residence at Glasgow Women’s Library as part of our developing ‘Tall Tales’ programme, exploring female narratives – the facts, fiction and myths. For Beth’s second week in residence this August, her research has moved into the specific areas of the role of men within Feminism verses the critical writing about the role of women, also from men. Upon discovering the seemingly large support from men during the pre-world war 1’s suffragette campaigns, and listening in detail of how radical and key women such as Mary Wollstonecraft had the support of many male peer writers, Beth has started to weave ideas together about this seemingly pro-active support from men in juxtaposition with the theoretical writings of the 1700’s – where some claimed that all theory, all writing and thus all opinion could only ever be that of a man’s thought – as our language was written by man. ‘How can a woman then, ever own language’? This argument, however in contemporary terms seems weak, was a theory stated for 100’s of years from key and well respected theorists at the time, and texts about this are all included within the collections at Glasgow Women’s Library.

Beth sees these writings as ‘juicy critique’ to delve further and intends to play potential scenarios and discovered texts out in the form of a new video work.

Beth will return for her final week in residence for the last week of October, where the public are invited to join her and come along to ask what she has been working on in response to the collections at Glasgow Women’s Library.

Get in touch with the Wewiora Projects if you want to find out more here

Beth Collar exploring the library; radicals, heroins & fragments of monuments

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Today was the first research day for Wewioraprojects to catch up with current Tall Tales artist-in-residence Beth Collar. Currently working on-site at Glasgow Women’s Library, Beth has been researching the library collections and archives delving specifically into areas including suffragette publications and literature and discovering the initial but often overlooked campaigning for emancipation which pre-dated WW1.

It was also a chance to catch up with Glasgow Women Library’s Adele Patrick to discuss the plans for our proposed first leg of a touring exhibition programme – which would include the outcomes of Beth’s residency alongside 10-12 other female artists work which focus on narrative.

And what better way to finish a day of research and planning that by listening to a unique insight into the life of Mary Wollstonecraft – a radical and writer and mother of Author Mary Shelley. Listening from both a English Literature expert and a producer of large performance and film events, both Susan Manly (of St. Andrews University) and Dr Anna Birch (of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland) gave very different but equally insightful presentations about this remarkable woman’s life – one which admittedly I did not know enough about before hand.

I was particularly drawn by the fragment of texts by Wollstonecraft wrote,  entitled ‘Lessons’ which focused on conversations between a daughter and her mother. Enlightening and curiously contemporary texts on the role of a child, her relationship to others and her future role as an individual; a woman – even more outstanding when considered this was written in 1700’s.

With talks, workshops and such a fantastic library collection and archive for Beth to delve into this is set to a fully rewarding residency experience! Beth will be in-residence for one more week in August and then will return after a short break for a final week in the second half of September – so do keep an eye out for her!

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Cross Acres Knitting ladies venture North to see Victoria Square gardens

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Last week the Cross Acres Knitting group from Wythenshawe, came for a site visit and workshop to see the Victoria Square garden and meet with local residents to develop their current garden game board piece which will be unveiled and played with on the Northern Art Carbooty day event!

Trevor, the Victoria Square resident who has built up the beautiful garden from a car park to the glorious green spot it is today showed the knitting ladies around before they went along to work with a few other residents and Common Ground Collectives, Claire Tindale and Liz Wewiora, on the garden game board patches.

Slugs, pigeons, cats and a flurry of insects took over the Victoria square community centre room that day!

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